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About Me

2x entrepreneur looking to marry data to product and growth in forward thinking, entrepreneurial, tech driven businesses.

My last business, based in China, produced packaging software for manufacturers serving customers like Godiva, LVMH, and Victoria's Secret.

Previously started and scaled a fitness company across 5 cities in Canada, written production code for most platforms in most mainstream languages, architected APIs for Microsoft Azure, built build infrastructure for the Nvidia Tegra, designed text mining algorithms for Amazon.

Resume here.

References available on request.

Comments

  1. Hey, you had some nice words for me a few months ago on Ycombinator. I wanted to let you know that I really appreciated it then and I still do today. I am proud to have the same major as someone of your character.

    I have a job and its my first after startups, generally "best practices" has been thrown out the window since the 90's. I am starting to understand your post more and more. Again thanks. I hope Feat Forge works out in your favor!

    ReplyDelete

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